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Hawaii & South Pacific Islands

  • Departure Date02 Oct 2022
  • Holland America Line Zuiderdam
  • 47 Nights Cruise & Stay
  • Prices From £6,099 per person

Itinerary

  • Stay 1 night in San Diego
  • San Diego
  • Hilo
  • Honolulu
  • Nawiliwili
  • Lahaina
  • Kona
  • Fanning Island
  • Pago Pago
  • Apia
  • Suva
  • Dravuni, Fiji Islands
  • Nuku 'Alofa
  • Vava 'u, Tonga Islands
  • Alofi
  • Rarotonga
  • Bora Bora
  • Raiatea
  • Papeete
  • Moorea
  • Rangiroa
  • Taiohae
  • San Diego

Enjoy an unforgettable holiday like never before, taking in the very best of mesmerising Hawaii and the jaw-dropping South Pacific on board the magnificent Zuiderdam. Be inspired and amazed by the infinite picturesque beauty you will experience on board this 47 night delight. With picture-perfect beaches, world-class surfing spots and spectacular natural beauty, it is no wonder Hawaii is known as paradise on Earth. Find yourself in the crystal-clear aqua waters in the South Pacific, exploring tropical rainforests, soaring mountains and appreciating the gorgeous tropical sea-life. These beautiful islands are the definition of paradise; their wild beauty will spark your imagination, while the friendly locals will make you feel right at home.

Highlights

  • FREE San Diego Stay
  • Drinks, Speciality Dining, Shore Excursion & WiFi Included

What's Included?

  • Return flights from the UK (call for regional departures)
  • FREE 1 night stay in San Diego on room only basis
  • 45 night cruise on board Zuiderdam on full board basis
  • Drinks, Speciality Dining, Shore Excursion & WiFi

Prices From pp

Departure DateInteriorOceanviewBalconySuite
Oct 2022£6,099£6,399£8,689£12,849

Price based on 02 Oct 2022 flying from London. Transfers are not included. Prices are subject to availability and may change out with our control. Flight supplements from regional airports will apply. For a live price for your chosen date, airport and hotels please call our Cruise Experts.

Platinum Trusted Service Award 2021

Average Customer Rating: 4.9/5Independent Service Rating based on verified reviews.Read all reviews
Feefo Platinum Trusted Service Award

Outstanding service, expertise and experience, I wouldn’t go anywhere else.

Outstanding service, nothing is a problem, Nicola Boyd seems to go above and beyond top service to solve the many problems that Covid cancellations and rescheduling cruises throws up. She has been excellent and has a great deal of expertise and experience and has booked us cruises in the past, but in the current Covid situation she had to cancel our Alaska trip, dealing with airlines, hotels, train and cruise lines. All of this she took in her stride, and then she helped us book a different cruise from Southampton, and sorted out all the various questions we had to our complete satisfaction. We love cruises and won’t be going anywhere else to book, other than Scotland’s Cruise Centre, and I highly recommend them to friends or anyone looking to book a cruise.

Mr Lorimer / September 2021

Pleased with service.

Prompt at answering telephone. Dealt with query and booking well. Also dealt with adjust well. Explained when to book trips etc.

Mrs Matthews / September 2021

Fantastic Service, staff very helpful and friendly

Booked a last minute cruise, staff very helpful and ensured that I had all relevant documentation and cover for the cruise, great service

Mrs Graham / September 2021

Read All Reviews

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Zuiderdam

First of our Vista-class ships, Zuiderdam boasts classic nautical lines and finishes, modern amenities and a spectacular art and antique collection.

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Itinerary for Hawaii & South Pacific Islands

Day 1 - Fly UK to San Diego / Enjoy San Diego

Day 2 - Embark Zuiderdam in San Diego

Easygoing San Diego embodies the Southern California surfer town fantasy, with its more than 300 days of sun, mild year-round temperatures and accessible, sporty pastimes and tourist attractions. Cruise to San Diego and hike the Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve to get a glimpse of whale migrations, go sailing in the bay and, of course, surf the famous swells of Del Mar, Oceanside and La Jolla (among many other superb spots). Cruise from San Diego and explore the sixth-largest city in the United States. Discover San Diego’s distinctive neighborhoods on a San Diego shore excursion. Visit Old Town, North Park, Point Loma and Coronado are all within a few miles of the port, while the bustling Gaslamp Quarter and Little Italy are within walking distance. And while there are lots of things to do for everyone on a San Diego Cruise—from visiting the country’s largest urban park to taking in the famous horse-racing season in Del Mar to riding the charming Old Town Trolley—definitely don’t pass up the chance to investigate San Diego’s quickly growing reputation as a culinary destination. Its inventive new restaurants and huge craft-brewing industry are something to be explored.

Day 3 - At Sea

Day 4 - At Sea

Day 5 - At Sea

Day 6 - At Sea

Day 7 - At Sea

Day 8 - Hilo

Water and fire reign here: This is a land of verdant rain forests bisected by sparkling falls. But the fiery element flares along the volcanic coast of Kohala and the roaring furnace of the Kilauea volcano: Lava has continued to seep from the crater since its last eruption in 1983. Nature is Hilo's blessing, as well as its challenge. The beautiful crescent bay served as a funnel to two major tsunamis that battered the city—tragedies that are never forgotten and hopefully never repeated. (Hilo's Pacific Tsunami Museum remains a leader in safety education.) Once a busy fishing and farming area, Hilo blossomed into a commercial center for the sugarcane industry in the 1800s. Today’s town—its waterfront rebuilt since the last destructive wall of water in 1960—flourishes as a hub of galleries, independent shops, farmers markets and homegrown destination restaurants. A world-class astronomy center has joined this mix, underlining the awe unfolding through the telescopes atop Mauna Kea (the world's tallest peak from base to summit, outstripping Everest by 1,363 meters, or 4,472 feet!). Meanwhile, leafy Banyan Drive celebrates more earthbound stars with its arboreal Walk of Fame. Look up, look down: Wherever you glance, Hilo looks good.

Day 9 - Honolulu

Honolulu, on the island of Oahu’s south shore, is capital of Hawaii and gateway to the U.S. island chain. The Waikiki neighborhood is its center for dining, nightlife and shopping, famed for its iconic crescent beach backed by palms and high-rise hotels, with volcanic Diamond Head crater looming in the distance. Sites relating to the World War II attack on Pearl Harbor include the USS Arizona Memorial.

Day 10 - Honolulu

Honolulu, on the island of Oahu’s south shore, is capital of Hawaii and gateway to the U.S. island chain. The Waikiki neighborhood is its center for dining, nightlife and shopping, famed for its iconic crescent beach backed by palms and high-rise hotels, with volcanic Diamond Head crater looming in the distance. Sites relating to the World War II attack on Pearl Harbor include the USS Arizona Memorial.

Day 11 - Nawiliwili

Get ready for lush fern grottos, grand canyons and the dramatic cliffs of the Na Pali Coast (experienced by helicopter and from the decks of your Holland America ship during an afternoon of scenic cruising). Sample shore excursions: Kipu Falls Zipline Trek; Kauai's Grand Helicopter Tour.

Day 12 - Lahaina

Glamorous resorts, stunning beaches, world-class golf courses, historic Lahaina Town: This enchanting island has it all, plus a magnificent volcano and the annual migration of the humpback whales. Sample shore excursions: Haleakala Crater & Iao Valley; Adventure to Hana; Lana'i Wild Dolphin & Snorkel Adventure.

Day 13 - Kona

Once the playground of Hawaii's royalty, Kona is synonymous with the famous coffee that grows on the slopes of dormant Hualalai. Here, too, is Parker Ranch, the largest privately owned ranch in the U.S. Sample shore excursions: Kona Outrigger Canoe Adventure; Parker Ranch; Big Island Helicopter Spectacular.

Day 14 - At Sea

Day 15 - Crossing the International Date line

Day 16 - At Sea

Day 17 - Fanning Island / Crossing the Equator / Crossing the International Date line

Pristine reefs, white sand beaches and friendly locals – Tabuaeran, or Fanning Island as it’s commonly known – is a remote tropical paradise. Buy handmade crafts from the islanders including jewelry, palm frond baskets and hand-carved wood pieces. Go on a fishing expedition or head to private Napali Beach to nap in an ocean-side hammock. During your stay, savor the breathtaking views, calm azure seas, expansive beaches and sun-drenched landscape.

Day 18 - At Sea

Day 19 - At Sea

Day 20 - Pago Pago / Crossing the International Date line

Pago Pago’s small size belies its historic stature and epic setting. The city—or more accurately, cluster of several fishing villages—lies along the shore of Pago Pago Harbor, which was carved from thousands of years of volcanic-crater erosion on Tutuila Island. The fjordlike harbor, one of the most stunning in the South Pacific, is bordered by steep and lush hills and dominated by Rainmaker Mountain. The protected harbor site was selected in 1872 by Commander R.W. Meade for a fuelling station for the U.S. Navy. Meade negotiated the real estate deal with a Samoan high chief and the resulting naval base at Pago Pago was in use from 1900 to 1951. Pago Pago itself is tranquil as far as capital cities go, though there is commerce and activity in the areas of Fagatogo and Utulei. The hills near the seafront are dotted with houses, while a variety of shops line the street that runs in front of the dock itself. The best views of the harbor and downtown can be had from the summit of Mount Alava in the National Park of American Samoa.

Day 21 - At Sea

Day 22 - Apia

The remote Polynesian nation of Samoa, surrounded by dragonfly-bright seas, boasts a dramatic volcanic landscape with vibrant green jungles. The country has two major landmasses: Upolu, the most populous of the Samoan islands, and Savai'i, the third-largest Polynesian island. Samoa's capital, Apia, sits midway along Upolu's north coast. This sprawling metropolitan area features a waterfront promenade and Beach Road, an avenue curving along the harbor where the Royal Samoa Police Band marches and hoists the national flag at Government House on weekday mornings. Check out their sharp ensembles, which feature navy lavalava (kilts) and robin's-egg-blue dress shirts. Adventurers will want to make a splash at Palolo Deep National Marine Reserve near Apia harbor, while bookworms make a beeline to the home and grave of Robert Louis Stevenson. But perhaps the best way to experience fa'a Samoa (the Samoan Way) is by visiting the small villages scattered throughout the two islands. Here, you'll see locals still living in traditional fales—round thatched homes with no walls, all the better to enjoy the ocean breeze—and cooking on umus, "ovens" of hot stones placed in shallow holes in the ground.

Day 23 - At Sea

Day 24 - Suva

In the time before time, the people who would become the Fijians were shaped of wet earth, pulled from the sea on a giant fishhook and given more than 300 islands to live on. Or if you want to be a little more prosaic, the people of Fiji were part of the great Lapita migration, which began somewhere around Taiwan and headed east. The first boats to arrive stopped migrating when they found this maze of islands formed by the earth turning itself inside out with volcanoes. The new Fijians spent a couple centuries involved in internecine war and developed the bad habit of using clubs to bop all strangers. But strangers kept showing up for the simple reason that Fiji, especially the southeast coast of Viti Levu, was geographically wonderful: the kind of spot that made mariners chuck their anchors and start trying to make a living as a settler. And who knows, maybe the Fijians just had tired arms, but by the time missionaries came, powers had shifted and the bopping had stopped. Today that southeast corner of the largest island in Fiji, the city of Suva, holds three-quarters of the nation’s population. It’s also shielded by shimmering green mountains opening to a calm sea, a land lush with afternoon rains.

Day 25 - Dravuni, Fiji Islands

During the great age of exploration, when sailors were poking into every unknown corner of the globe, nobody went to the islands of Fiji, including Dravuni, some 65 kilometers (40 miles) to the south of the main island of Fiji. Ships would sail up far enough to see perfect beaches, blue-hole reefs and mountains big enough to be called mountains, but not so big you'd kill yourself hauling a cannon up one. But then the Fijians would appear. Enormous people, faces tattooed in intricate designs, each carrying that one essential of Fijian life: a dark wooden club studded with shark teeth. The cannibal’s best friend. Most of the stories of head-hunting and cannibalism were set in Fiji, where the greatest honors were given to those who brought home the most enemy heads. Since the residents of the archipelago’s 300 islands had been warring with each other for centuries, they saw in the arrival of representatives of the outside world an exciting (and potentially tasty) development. But all things must pass, even cannibal rituals. Life on Fiji changed and these days, Fijians still come down to meet ships and they still carry war clubs, but instead of looking for lunch, they’re looking to yell "Bula!" in greeting to as many people as the day allows.

Day 26 - At Sea

Day 27 - Nuku 'Alofa

Unique in many ways, Tonga is the only country in the South Pacific that has never been colonized. The secret to this tiny kingdom's lasting autonomy lies with its monarchy - rich in culture and tradition; unafraid to modernize and move forward. You'll find Nuku'alofa on the isle of Tongatapu - the largest of the 171 island jewels in the Tongan crown. Hopefully the Tongan people, cheerful and welcoming, will treat you to a version of the lakalaka - their compelling art of storytelling manifested in a breathtaking dance.

Day 28 - Vava 'u, Tonga Islands / Crossing the International Date line / Alofi

The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of the Kingdom of Tonga—an even larger collection of tropical Pacific Ocean islands. With an ideal year-round climate that’s perfect for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sailing, the islands—which are mostly uninhabited—boast a varied set of attractions for visitors that only begin with their famed white-sand beaches lapped by turquoise waters (with visibility down to 30 meters, or 100 feet) and enchanting coral reefs teeming with abundant marine life like tropical fish, dolphins and sea turtles. In addition to these simple but highly memorable watery pleasures, the Vava’u islands offer tropical forests, limestone cliffs and caves to explore, traditional villages to check out and a wealth of activities ranging from sea kayaking and gamefishing to yachting. Not only can you spot humpback whales (between July and October) and take in the unique atmosphere of historic cemeteries, you can also enjoy a hike up Mount Talau. The island’s tourism infrastructure extends to boutique resorts and ecolodges, as well as plenty of cafés and restaurants, particularly in the main city of Neiafu. VIEW CRUISES Featur

Once known as the "Savage Island" due to the unfriendly welcome given to explorer Captain Cook in 1774, Niue is a small South Pacific island known for its large raised coral reef and its tiny capital "city," Alofi. While it uses New Zealand currency (bring it with you, there are no ATMs on Niue) and many of its inhabitants primarily reside on the "mainland," Niue has been a sovereign state since 1974, and it is considerably more welcoming now than in Captain Cook's time. It takes only a few hours to cover the whole island, which is dotted with scenic sea tracks that connect coral reefs, caves, chasms and rain forest. Niue is also well connected with the rest of the world: The entire nation is a free Wi-Fi hotspot, though be warned that the arrival of a cruise ship and its many Internet-using passengers can slow speeds considerably. Coconuts and tropical fruits are a staple in the Niuean diet, and even the local seafood mainstay uga translates to coconut crab. Should your visit to the island fall on a Sunday, you'll find most everything closed for church services, but you can head to the Washaway Café, home to the only self-service bar in the South Pacific—and open only on Sundays.

Day 29 - At Sea

Day 30 - Rarotonga

This dramatic South Pacific island is complete with miles of white sand beaches, glittering lagoons, small villages, and volcanic peaks covered in lush vegetation. Visit the Cook Island Cultural Village and experience the lifestyle of the Maori people; walk the Cross Island Trek amid fragrant frangipani and be rewarded with beautiful views and waterfalls; and of course spend time luxuriating on a peaceful beach as the trade winds maintain a perfect temperature.

Day 31 - At Sea

Day 32 - Bora Bora

When you arrive to Tahiti on your Bora Bora cruise you first see it from the ship as it navigates Teavanui Pass, you'll be astonished. Brilliant blue water in far too many shades to count and palm-dotted white-sand motus (islets) encircle a lush island topped by craggy Mount Otemanu. Close your eyes and open them again. Yes, you are on a beautiful French Polynesia cruise and it’s all real! This South Pacific isle with its exotic Tahitian-French allure has been captivating honeymooners and vacationers from the time the first overwater bungalows were built here nearly 50 years ago. For years, Bora-Bora has also drawn a multitude of divers eager to scope out its array of reef fish, rays and sharks. It's hard to compete with the sheer drama of the water, or with shape-shifting Mount Otemanu, which looks completely different from every angle. In fact, Vaitape, the island's largest city with a population of about 5,000 people, doesn’t even try to compete. Not much changes in this sleepy port, where a few black-pearl shops, boutiques and galleries join a weathered church and several small cafés. Yes, you might want to buy a pearl and you should definitely sample the poisson cru (raw fish marinated in coconut milk and lime juice). But to be honest, the best spot you can visit on your Bora-Bora cruise anywhere out on the lagoon.

Day 33 - Bora Bora

When you arrive to Tahiti on your Bora Bora cruise you first see it from the ship as it navigates Teavanui Pass, you'll be astonished. Brilliant blue water in far too many shades to count and palm-dotted white-sand motus (islets) encircle a lush island topped by craggy Mount Otemanu. Close your eyes and open them again. Yes, you are on a beautiful French Polynesia cruise and it’s all real! This South Pacific isle with its exotic Tahitian-French allure has been captivating honeymooners and vacationers from the time the first overwater bungalows were built here nearly 50 years ago. For years, Bora-Bora has also drawn a multitude of divers eager to scope out its array of reef fish, rays and sharks. It's hard to compete with the sheer drama of the water, or with shape-shifting Mount Otemanu, which looks completely different from every angle. In fact, Vaitape, the island's largest city with a population of about 5,000 people, doesn’t even try to compete. Not much changes in this sleepy port, where a few black-pearl shops, boutiques and galleries join a weathered church and several small cafés. Yes, you might want to buy a pearl and you should definitely sample the poisson cru (raw fish marinated in coconut milk and lime juice). But to be honest, the best spot you can visit on your Bora-Bora cruise anywhere out on the lagoon.

Day 34 - Raiatea

Oro, god of war, guards his temple deep in the rain forest of Raiatea. Nearby on Mt. Temehani grows the rare and delicate tiare apetahi flower, whose petals open only at dawn in the presence of lovers. Sample shore excursions: Faaroa River Jungle Cruise; Raiatea - The Sacred Island; 4-wheel-drive Safari.

Day 35 - Papeete

When Captain James Cook first sailed to Tahiti in 1769, he and his crew all thought they’d found paradise. Cook hinted at it in his journals, in coy language that would have been acceptable in his day; his men felt considerably less reserve, and returned home sporting tattoos and stories of a people who ate what fell from trees, and lived lives of freedom unknown in Europe. All without much need for clothes. Although all of French Polynesia is sometimes referred to as Tahiti, Tahiti proper is only one island, ringed by a reef that turns the water shades of blue even sapphires can’t come near. Rivers flow down from its high peaks, and every night, the sun goes down behind the neighboring island of Moorea, outlining the mountains like a laser show. Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, is a bustling business and government center, with black-pearl shops on almost every corner. As you move into the countryside, time starts to slip, and it's just the changeless ocean and the almost unchanged forests—and much the same sensation that made Cook think he'd found heaven on earth.

Day 36 - Papeete / Moorea

When Captain James Cook first sailed to Tahiti in 1769, he and his crew all thought they’d found paradise. Cook hinted at it in his journals, in coy language that would have been acceptable in his day; his men felt considerably less reserve, and returned home sporting tattoos and stories of a people who ate what fell from trees, and lived lives of freedom unknown in Europe. All without much need for clothes. Although all of French Polynesia is sometimes referred to as Tahiti, Tahiti proper is only one island, ringed by a reef that turns the water shades of blue even sapphires can’t come near. Rivers flow down from its high peaks, and every night, the sun goes down behind the neighboring island of Moorea, outlining the mountains like a laser show. Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, is a bustling business and government center, with black-pearl shops on almost every corner. As you move into the countryside, time starts to slip, and it's just the changeless ocean and the almost unchanged forests—and much the same sensation that made Cook think he'd found heaven on earth.

Jagged needle-shaped mountains define the skyline. Below, fields of pineapple, vanilla and coffee carpet the land, while crystal-clear lagoons teem with parrot fish, purple anemone and lacy pink coral. Sample shore excursions: Motu Beach Picnic & Ray Feeding; Circle Island Tour & Belvedere; Auto Safari Adventure.

Day 37 - Rangiroa

The world's second-biggest atoll, Rangiroa, is a wonderfully languorous and remote place to explore. It's beautiful: The stark whiteness of the bleached coral contrasted against the turquoise water creates vivid delight for the eyes. The lagoon here is vast and dazzling, ringed by gorgeous white-sand islets accessible only by boat and just perfect for lazing away a long afternoon. The majority of visitors come here to dive, but Rangi (as locals call it) offers more ways to explore its magnificent lagoon than to just go deep: Opt instead for a relaxed snorkel, or take a glass-bottom boat out for a cruise. The port town of Avatoru may seem middle-of-nowhere quiet to most Westerners, but this is the hub of the Tuamotu Archipelago. The town's paved roads, shops and even gourmet restaurants are not standard amenities on other atolls in this far-flung island group. But should you prefer to not spend the day in the water, there are experiences to be had on terra firma. Head to a small site overlooking Tiputa Pass to watch the daily performances of dolphins dancing in the waves created by the strong current. Or stop in at a pearl farm to learn how the famed black pearls are cultured—and then treat yourself to a bit of shopping afterward.

Day 38 - At Sea

Day 39 - Taiohae

The dramatic landscape of the Marquesas is like nowhere else in French Polynesia. Formed by volcanoes, islands like Nuku Hiva—home to the charming port town of Taiohae—don't have a barrier reef or lagoon to protect them. As such, the sea crashes directly up onto the shore, creating wild scenery that has inspired artists and writers from Paul Gauguin to Herman Melville. At the base of craggy, soaring peaks, Taiohae may be the main "city" in this far-flung island group, but don't expect tall buildings or massive resorts. Instead, Taiohae has a peaceful village vibe with an air of tropical languor. There's not much to do other than wander and shop. And shop you should, as the Marquesans are known for their excellent handicrafts. On Nuku Hiva you'll find skilled carvers working in wood, bone and volcanic stone to create true pieces of art. Beyond Taiohae are opportunities to explore Nuku Hiva's wild interior—replete with sharp basalt pinnacles and lush, green river valleys—by either horseback or on foot.

Day 40 - At Sea

Day 41 - Crossing the Equator

Day 42 - At Sea

Day 43 - At Sea

Day 44 - At Sea

Day 45 - At Sea

Day 46 - At Sea

Day 47 - San Diego, disembark & transfer to airport / Fly San Diego to UK

Easygoing San Diego embodies the Southern California surfer town fantasy, with its more than 300 days of sun, mild year-round temperatures and accessible, sporty pastimes and tourist attractions. Cruise to San Diego and hike the Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve to get a glimpse of whale migrations, go sailing in the bay and, of course, surf the famous swells of Del Mar, Oceanside and La Jolla (among many other superb spots). Cruise from San Diego and explore the sixth-largest city in the United States. Discover San Diego’s distinctive neighborhoods on a San Diego shore excursion. Visit Old Town, North Park, Point Loma and Coronado are all within a few miles of the port, while the bustling Gaslamp Quarter and Little Italy are within walking distance. And while there are lots of things to do for everyone on a San Diego Cruise—from visiting the country’s largest urban park to taking in the famous horse-racing season in Del Mar to riding the charming Old Town Trolley—definitely don’t pass up the chance to investigate San Diego’s quickly growing reputation as a culinary destination. Its inventive new restaurants and huge craft-brewing industry are something to be explored.

Arrive UK

Platinum Trusted Service Award 2021

Average Customer Rating: 4.9/5Independent Service Rating based on verified reviews.Read all reviews
Feefo Platinum Trusted Service Award

Outstanding service, expertise and experience, I wouldn’t go anywhere else.

Outstanding service, nothing is a problem, Nicola Boyd seems to go above and beyond top service to solve the many problems that Covid cancellations and rescheduling cruises throws up. She has been excellent and has a great deal of expertise and experience and has booked us cruises in the past, but in the current Covid situation she had to cancel our Alaska trip, dealing with airlines, hotels, train and cruise lines. All of this she took in her stride, and then she helped us book a different cruise from Southampton, and sorted out all the various questions we had to our complete satisfaction. We love cruises and won’t be going anywhere else to book, other than Scotland’s Cruise Centre, and I highly recommend them to friends or anyone looking to book a cruise.

Mr Lorimer / September 2021

Pleased with service.

Prompt at answering telephone. Dealt with query and booking well. Also dealt with adjust well. Explained when to book trips etc.

Mrs Matthews / September 2021

Fantastic Service, staff very helpful and friendly

Booked a last minute cruise, staff very helpful and ensured that I had all relevant documentation and cover for the cruise, great service

Mrs Graham / September 2021

Read All Reviews

Speak to a Cruise Expert

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